?

Log in

No account? Create an account

You need art in your life. Well, unless you packed a gun.

« previous entry | next entry »
Jun. 21st, 2008 | 03:34 pm
mood: relaxedFinished my travelogue!
music: And within 7 days of my return. Do I get a medal now?

Boston, Part 3.

Last part of the travelogue! Sunday, June 15 was a cool and overcast day in Boston, and I took it easy after the shenanigans of the last couple of days. First up was brunch with Sam at Tremont 647, which has "pajama brunch" perhaps so that the employees can feel more comfortable working in the very narrow restaurant. I had an Italian sausage scramble with bacon and toast on the side, and was most pleased. We also had free "momos" as an appetizer; I still don't know what those are, but they were delicious little bits of mystery. Following, we waddled back to Sam's place to plan the rest of the day, and finally decided to see the Institute of Contemporary Art. We took a leisurely 45 minute walk out that way with Sam's unpredictable umbrella, finally arriving around 3. I had assumed it would be pretty cool, but ICA far exceeded my expectations, from the giant bedroom-sized elevator to the fabulous exhibits, including a huge Anish Kapoor exhibit, their very quirky permanent collection, and the History of Rock wall.


Very gray Boston waterfront



I like art, even when I am cold.



Sam with the umbrella that kept popping open at inappropriate times.




I had tons of fun running around the Kapoor pieces, watching the very hip gallery attendants desperately trying to keep people from touching them, and generally wandering around. The building is also really insane and brand new, so we stayed until they closed at 5, then walked back toward downtown to catch the T at South Station, which is a fabulous train terminal that I should have photographed.


ICA Boston. All galleries are on the fourth floor, with a cool view of the water and "Anthony's Pier 4 Restaurant." Woo.




Later that evening, we had sushi at Oishii, stuffing ourselves on multiple rolls of amazingness. I don't remember what we ordered and I kind of don't care because it was just that awesome. After some green tea ice cream and waddling home, it was a quiet night of falling asleep on the couch while watching the Lakers-Celtics game (I'm such a huge NBA fan, you see).

I awoke early on Monday, June 16 and stuffed everything into my suitcase so I could make it to the airport more easily later. Then I had a yogurt and OJ and made my way to Cambridge again. The T this time was "having signal problems" which didn't allow the Red Line to go faster than 10 MPH in some areas; it was overall pretty annoying. I mean, it appears so awesome to have this extensive subway network at your fingertips that can take you anywhere you want to go for $1.70. In practice, though, it's really old and having trouble keeping up with the loads of riders, so this isn't a perfect situation. Still, I was glad for it and eventually made it to Cambridge to visit the Harvard School of Design (I may apply for their urban planning MA program next year).

This was their first day of summer school and it was a bit frantic, but I did manage to get a short interview with an admissions woman there, and also got to poke around their weird but interesting building for a while. The big highlight is a five-story atrium where each grad student gets a little studio space, and their library also looked pretty decent.


Studio atrium, with skylights and glass walls all around to make you feel as if you actually get to go outside.




Following my visit, Emily and I met up, I dashed into CVS to get thank-you-for-hosting gifts for Sam and Corrine, and then we had coffee (okay, Diet Pepsi) at Au Bon Pain and chatted for a while. Then I returned to drop off my gifts (nothing says thanks like chocolate and toilet paper!) and pick up my luggage and meet Sam for lunch. We wandered through the neighborhood of his workplace and finally found a place to have giant burgers while watching the U.S. Open with some surprisingly rowdy patrons. But the food was good (I had pasta salad with the burger, should have gone for the twice-fried fries as Sam did) after my morning of adventure, and we hung around for a while before making the trek to yet another T station to get to the airport.

After I was all checked in and had surrendered my civil liberties to the TSA, I settled in at Logan and desperately tried to catch up on work e-mail, with some success. Before I knew it, the time had come to board my flight .. except that we had no plane. I stuck near the waiting crew as they had more information than anyone else, and our very tired plane finally arrived at 5:45 or so and we boarded really quickly.


Our NW crew waiting to board the plane




What was probably my last ever flight on a DC-9 was smooth and uneventful, and then I ran like hell through DTW to get to my next flight. In fact, I ran so fast that I completely passed it and wondered who had fucked up the gate numbers before realizing my mistake. *facepalm* Anwyay, I did eventually find my flight, on a brand new Compass plane, and we departed perfectly on time as the sun set. At 9:00 p.m.! Detroiters get really long days in the summer. That was also an uneventful flight, except for the guy sitting next to me who protected his 2 slices of pizza like they were topped with diamonds. Then we arrived in Richomnd and I took the parking shuttle back to OJ, where I overheard this gem of a conversation from two young guys that had just returned to town:

Shuttle Dude 1: What do you need in your luggage anyway that can't wait until tomororw?
Shuttle Dude 2: My toothbrush ... my deodorant ... my gun.

I drove off from the boys of Richmond, and made a quick stop for food at a McDonald's off I-64, quickly realizing that convenience is often a mistake, as I waited almost 20 minutes for my order. But once I was underway again, the drive was easy; there were several quite peaceful 20-30 mile stretches when I saw no other cars, and there was nothing but lightning to see. Somehow I got home in one piece at 2:00 a.m.





Boston, you treated me well, but goddamn was I not prepared for 55 degree weather in June.

Link | Leave a comment | Share

Comments {7}

Gregory

(no subject)

from: ghstlght74
date: Jun. 21st, 2008 09:46 pm (UTC)
Link

I love that picture of you in front of ICA Boston. Very handsome. And I think I could deal with 55 degree weather in June. . .one reason I want to leave SC and move elsewhere, Boston being in my top 5.

Reply | Thread

jonathan

(no subject)

from: silverthief2
date: Jun. 22nd, 2008 03:10 pm (UTC)
Link

Yeah, it wasn't bad, but I just wasn't prepared for it.

Reply | Parent | Thread

Gregory

(no subject)

from: ghstlght74
date: Jun. 22nd, 2008 03:19 pm (UTC)
Link

Sometimes those are the best pictures, the ones you aren't prepared for.

Reply | Parent | Thread

Brian

(no subject)

from: bender772
date: Jun. 21st, 2008 11:38 pm (UTC)
Link

I have been so spoiled with long summer days growing up in the Detroit area. Nevertheless, it was even better when I was living in Germany. The sun didn't set there in the summer until after 10pm. Granted, we paid the price in the winter when the sun set incredibly early. But, I'd gladly pay that price again.

Reply | Thread

jonathan

(no subject)

from: silverthief2
date: Jun. 22nd, 2008 03:10 pm (UTC)
Link

I feel you. I think it would be well worth it.

Reply | Parent | Thread

mark

(no subject)

from: kishenehn
date: Jun. 22nd, 2008 03:08 am (UTC)
Link

For some unknown reason, that photo of you makes me want to give you a hug.

Reply | Thread

jonathan

(no subject)

from: silverthief2
date: Jun. 22nd, 2008 03:09 pm (UTC)
Link

I also would have accepted a warmer coat. :P

Reply | Parent | Thread